School-based Speech/Language Therapy

KID-FRIENDLY VISUALS TO HELP STUDENTS UNDERSTAND ABOUT COVID-19
 
 
AUTISM
 
 
PHONOLOGICAL PROCESS Activities for Speech Therapy
Dear Parents and Kiddos-
I hope all of my kids and families are staying in (when possible) and staying healthy, for that is of the upmost importance. Below you will find some speech/language activities you may participate in while at home. Hugs and Kisses to all my kiddos and prayers for continued health in the coming days.
Love,
Ms. Amber Potter, Speech Therapist
 
1.  Play with your child
Playing is a good way to communicate with your child and also build motor skills and many other benefits. Allow your child to tell you what to do. Stay in the background and do only what you are asked to do. Playing with your child builds confidence without pressurizing your child to talk. Playing is a fun part of your speech therapy activities!
 
 
2.  Tell your child what you are doing
When you are feeding, bathing or changing your child, keep talking about what you are doing. If you are going out, talk about where you are going with him/her in simple language. You will be amazed at the amount of things that tiny brain can store and bring out at the most appropriate times!
 
3.  Read books
Reading a book with lots of colorful pictures and words is one of the best speech therapy activities there is. Your child will love to look at a book curled up on your lap. Reading gets associated with security and love. This activity can lead your child to a life-long love of books.
 
4.  Introduce colors and shapes
Show your child colors on colorful building blocks and other items and gently point out the colors and shapes and say out the name of the shape and color as you play with her. Your child learns to distinguish both colors and shapes naturally and at the same time
 
5.  Hand gestures
Use lots of hand movements like clapping, peek-a-boo, itsy bitsy spider (fingers crawling up his arm), waving when you leave and other gestures along with the appropriate words. All these hands gestures help the child to associate a word with a meaning and build their vocabulary.
 
6.  Singing and rhyming
Sing children’s songs and nursery rhyme with your child. It is a vital part of your speech therapy activities. They encourage speech because of the presence of rhythm and rhyming words. It brings your child closer to you; you are both having fun and learning too!
 
7.  Introduce new words
Add to words your child already says like “doll,” if he/she says doll you say “big doll,” or “pink doll.” Your child learns other new words and is learning to associate words with each other. Point to you and say “mommy/daddy” and point to him and say his/her name
 
8.  Encourage communication
When your child says something, encourage him/her by making eye contact. Correct him/her only by repeating what he/she is saying with the correct words, so the child learns the correct way to say words.
 
This downloadable app is .99cents and it is totally worth it. Not only do you create and back some yummy virtual cookies..  you are reading, listening to someone read it to you, following instructions and directions, sequencing, identifying colors, objects and sounds and much more! Have fun and bake us a yummy cookie!