School-based Occupational Therapy

“School-based occupational therapy practitioners are occupational therapists (OTs) and occupational therapy assistants (OTAs) who use meaningful activities (occupations) to help children and youth participate in what they need and/or want to do in order to promote physical and mental health and well-being. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial and sensory components of performance. In schools, occupational therapy practitioners focus on academics, play and leisure, social participation, self-care skills (ADLs or Activities of Daily Living), and transition/work skills. Occupational therapy’s expertise includes activity and environmental analysis and modification with a goal of reducing the barriers to participation.” (AOTA, 2017)

Occupational Therapists Registered & Licensed (OTR/L):
Jennifer Ottinger, OTR/L
  • Nolachuckey, Camp Creek, SGMS, SGHS
 
Erin Gaby, OTR/L 
  • Baileyton, NGMS, NGHS, Doak, ELP (evals)/Glenwood, WGHS, Towering Oaks 
 
Grace Rehab Company
  • Chuckey, CDMS, CDHS, Mosheim, McDonald, WGMS
 
 
Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants & Licensed (COTA/L)
Cathy Davis, COTA/L
  • Doak, ELP/Glenwood
 
Grace Rehab Company
  • Chuckey, CDMS, CDHS, Mosheim, McDonald, WGMS
 
KID-FRIENDLY VISUALS TO HELP STUDENTS UNDERSTAND ABOUT COVID-19
 
 
AUTISM
 
 
HANDWRITING
  • "Letter School" app
    This is my favorite app for practicing how to write individual CAPITAL and lowercase letters and basic numbers!
     
    Available for smart phones and tablets via the Apple App store and Google Play store.
     
    If you have a stylus available, use it with this app to better simulate practice with a pencil/marker.
     
    Consider positioning your phone/tablet on an incline (i.e. leaned against a 3-ring binder) vs. having the device flat on a table surface.  This helps with wrist position, grasp, vision, and decreased neck strain.
 
  • "Build" letters out of household items, i.e. lay out pretzels to make a "P", LEGOs or Leaves for "L", markers for "M", dried beans for "B", crayons or cereal pieces for "C", etc.